Jump to content
Talk Whatever Online is becoming Deadicated Fans! Forum restructure is under construction ×

Ched Evans: Should he be allowed to return to football?


Omega
 Share

Should Ched Evans be allowed to return to Football?  

9 members have voted

  1. 1. Should Ched Evans be allowed to return to Football?



Recommended Posts

Simple question really but for those not in the know:

 

Evans denied raping a 19-year-old in his hotel room but was jailed in April 2012 following the incident in Rhyl, North Wales.

 

The 25-year-old Welsh international admitted having sex with the woman, who told the jury she had no memory of the incident.

 

Sheffield United has not yet said whether he will be allowed to play for them again.

 

Earlier this week, manager Nigel Clough said: "We have had one or two discussions, we are awaiting a decision and the owners will make that in good time."

 

The online petition urged the Bramall Lane club not to welcome him back, but many fans have called for him to be rehabilitated.

 

The prosecution said the woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was too drunk to consent to sexual intercourse.

 

Port Vale defender Clayton McDonald also admitted having sex with the victim but was found not guilty of the same charge.

 

Evans' case is due to be looked at by the Criminal Case Review Commission in the coming weeks.

 

The striker scored 48 goals in 113 games for Sheffield United before his imprisonment, including 35 in 42 games during the 2011/12 campaign which was cut short for him due to his trial and conviction.

 

He has been capped 13 times for Wales.

 

So should he be allowed to return to his job following completion of his sentencing?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 99
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Not a chance in hell.

 

He's not done enough time. I'd never share a locker room with him, and tbh whatever club that is stupid enough to take him on will regret it when the fans react to it. At the very very least, he should definitely be out of the public spotlight, no way does he deserve that much money no matter how talented he is.

 

Was reading the Sky News FB post on this, and it was full of people defending the guy, saying how the girl probably cried rape for publicity, and how he should go back because he scored 30 goals for his team that same season. Utterly bonkers if you ask me. This is exactly the reason why, when celebrities and famous people do rape people, they never come forward - because this is what they get. Scores of "You're just saying that for the money/fame" and for their heightened status to get them off early and back to their normal job on TV as if nothing happened.

 

Boils my blood so it does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Football has no morals and he'll no doubt be picked up by some club, but whoever does sign him could be facing a massive PR disaster, it's dangerous because he scores goals and is a good player overall and would contribute massively to whoever he signs for but to me the man is a scumbag and should not be allowed to earn as much as he does in a business where players are considered as role models for younger children.

 

Had this discussion with people and some have even suggested they would fall out with their partner if they chose to go to a game supporting a team which had a convicted rapist in it.

 

Can you imaging taking your young children to see the team he plays for and they are cheering for him, how would you feel?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh and Fury, he's not done his time. He's getting let off early on 'good behavior' from what I've heard. What an utter BS idea of good behavior means getting let out earlier...one of the many things that needs changing in our justice and legal system.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's served his prison sentence, he's entitled to go back to work. Just because he's a professional footballer doesn't change that. If he was a plumber or a salesman he would be able to go back to work and I dont see this being any different.

 

Whether you think he should have served more time is a different argument.

 

If he joined my club I wouldn't have a problem with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plumbers and salesmen aren't in the public eye as much as footballers. "Here is Ched Evans, ACE FOOTBALLER and convictedrapist". To me, it's like Chris Brown. Chris Brown beat the holy hell out of Rhianna. He's still adored by millions, while people with sense realize the guy is a docuhebag, no matter how talented he is, and needs to be thrown off his pedestal, preferably into a pit of spikes.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's served his prison sentence, he's entitled to go back to work. Just because he's a professional footballer doesn't change that. If he was a plumber or a salesman he would be able to go back to work and I dont see this being any different.

 

Whether you think he should have served more time is a different argument.

 

If he joined my club I wouldn't have a problem with it.

 

He hasn't though, he's been let off early for 'good behavior'. It is a different argument all together, but how could anyone justify allowing a convicted rapist going back to work in the public spotlight, where young girls and boys look up to them and cheer them on? It's kind of like "Oh, you severely traumatized a 19 year old girls life and her life will never be the same again, why don't you go into a cozy prison cell for half your sentence, then come out and go back to your overpaid, public, rolemodel job as if nothing happened?"

 

You seriously wouldn't mind sharing a locker room with a convicted rapist? I could never do it.

 

Plumbers and salesmen aren't in the public eye as much as footballers. "Here is Ched Evans, ACE FOOTBALLER and convictedrapist". To me, it's like Chris Brown. Chris Brown beat the holy hell out of Rhianna. He's still adored by millions, while people with sense realize the guy is a docuhebag, no matter how talented he is, and needs to be thrown off his pedestal, preferably into a pit of spikes.

 

Pretty much this. And Sam Pepper is another example. There's countless examples of it, and it's wrong in each case. People keep on saying about how so and so came back after doing x y and z, but it was wrong of them to come back too, and one wrong doesn't mean a precedent can be set allowing more wrongs to happen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He hasn't though, he's been let off early for 'good behavior'.

 

That means he's served his time. He's suffered the punishment that the law deemed appropriate. The sentence being legally reduced, or not being long enough in the first place has nothing to do with whether or not he served his sentence, which he evidently did.

 

I think it's up to the owners, and up to the FA. Obviously running with some silly "no criminals should ever work for anyone ever again" Daily Mail line is always silly, as Magic said, he served his sentence, he's legally free, he has to get on with something, but teams and leagues also have the right to hire and fire for moral reasons, and to sign players and staff to contracts with morality clauses.

 

Should he be allowed back? Technically, yes, if anyone wants him, but I don't think anyone should be pressured into taking him back if they don't want to. Teams and leagues are powerful, passion-inducing brands, and those brands have a right to strictly define who represents them publicly.

 

For the record, to go with Magic's comment, despite agreeing with him in terms of the question, if he joined my club, I very much would have a problem with it. I don't want to hang out with a rapist, and would feel very uncomfortable doing so. Maybe there's another reason for a team to reject him, that the other players don't want him around.

 

To me, it's like Chris Brown. Chris Brown beat the holy hell out of Rhianna. He's still adored by millions, while people with sense realize the guy is a docuhebag, no matter how talented he is, and needs to be thrown off his pedestal, preferably into a pit of spikes.

 

The Chris Brown thing is interesting. One, or a combination, of three things happened. One, everyone's kinda racist. Two, everyone wanted him to apologise more. Three, the people most angry didn't know who Chris Brown was before he beat up Rihanna, and now that's all they associate him with.

 

It really has to be one of those three, because we're on a wrestling site right now, a professional wrestling site, and we're talking about Chris Brown, a man who has no connection to this site, and isn't liked by really anyone on it. We aren't talking about Chris Jericho. We aren't talking about Steve Austin. We aren't talking about Taz, or Scott Steiner, or Jerry Lawler, or the Big Show, or any of the other endless list of wrestlers who have beaten or sexually assaulted women that really never get mentioned.

 

You can't pick and choose people who committed the same, or similar crimes, as say some deserve their pedestal, because you liked them before they did anything wrong, whilst people who don't know or care about, like footballers or RnB singers, can f*ck off because they're now defined to you by their crime. Everything anyone can say about Chris Brown and Chris Brown's fan base can be just as easily said about anyone who has ever cheered or appreciated to looked forward to one of Stone Cold's returns, or been to a Fozzy show, you're another fan cheering on a woman beater, but it feels different to you, because you're on the inside.

Edited by John Hancock
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could share a locker room with him yes, because what he (or anyone) has done in the past is of no interest to me, nor does it bare any relevance to how I go about my day, as harsh as that sounds. If it started to negatively effect the team or whatever and cause and issue then it would become a problem. But if he kept his head down and worked hard and the rest of the team accepted it then its not an issue for me.

 

I also don't think footballers are over paid for that matter, and I don't expect them to be role models. But I do think you highlighted some aspects of our justice system that do need addressed. Yes, convicted rapists should get longer and no they shouldn't be out in half the time. That goes for a whole host of crimes. But like I said above, thats a different argument and the question was no he has done the time the state have decided is fitting, what next?

 

And my answer to that is I wouldn't stop him going back to work. I don't think being in the public eye matters. People can make decisions, and if they chose not to support a team that his him in it fair enough. And if it doesn't bother some people, then that's fine with me.

 

I also believe in giving second chances.

 

Edit: And I wouldn't have a problem if my team signed him because I'd judge him purely from a footballing point of view. Not what he's done outside of football in his past. If it began to not make footballing/business sense, for example if his ability in the team was outweighed by negative PR or fans not turning up out of protest then there would be a problem.

Edited by Magic
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That means he's served his time. He's suffered the punishment that the law deemed appropriate. The sentence being legally reduced, or not being long enough in the first place has nothing to do with whether or not he served his sentence, which he evidently did.

 

Well that's fair enough, he may have served his sentence and technically and legally be free from it, but morally there is no end to the sentence so to speak. The weight of his actions will follow him around the rest of his life, and rightfully so.

 

I think it's up to the owners, and up to the FA. Obviously running with some silly "no criminals should ever work for anyone ever again" Daily Mail line is always silly, as Magic said, he served his sentence, he's legally free, he has to get on with something, but teams and leagues also have the right to hire and fire for moral reasons, and to sign players and staff to contracts with morality clauses.

 

Should he be allowed back? Technically, yes, if anyone wants him, but I don't think anyone should be pressured into taking him back if they don't want to. Teams and leagues are powerful, passion-inducing brands, and those brands have a right to strictly define who represents them publicly.

 

For the record, to go with Magic's comment, despite agreeing with him in terms of the question, if he joined my club, I very much would have a problem with it. I don't want to hang out with a rapist, and would feel very uncomfortable doing so. Maybe there's another reason for a team to reject him, that the other players don't want him around.

 

I think in legal terms there shouldn't be anything stopping him returning yeah, but just because there's no legal reason for him not to return doesn't mean he should. I don't believe in the 'every criminal should never work again' thing, but then again you can't exactly stick a rapist and someone who stole a car into the same room and call them equal in terms of crime. I wouldn't want served in McDonalds by a rapist, just like I wouldn't want to watch one on TV playing football. There's some crimes that deservedly so carry a weight of consequence about them that marks you for life, and that's the price you pay if you commit the crime in the first place.

 

The Chris Brown thing is interesting. One, or a combination, of three things happened. One, everyone's kinda racist. Two, everyone wanted him to apologise more. Three, the people most angry didn't know who Chris Brown was before he beat up Rihanna, and now that's all they associate him with.

 

It really has to be one of those three, because we're on a wrestling site right now, a professional wrestling site, and we're talking about Chris Brown, a man who has no connection to this site, and isn't liked by really anyone on it. We aren't talking about Chris Jericho. We aren't talking about Steve Austin. We aren't talking about Taz, or Scott Steiner, or Jerry Lawler, or the Big Show, or any of the other endless list of wrestlers who have beaten or sexually assaulted women that really never get mentioned.

 

I just think that he should not return because he'll be a terrible role-model to kids who look up to footballers, and it'll just confuse them if you tell them "you can like footballers, just not that one - he's bad" because then they'll think "If he's bad then why is he there?"

 

You can't pick and choose people who committed the same, or similar crimes, as say some deserve their pedestal, because you liked them before they did anything wrong, whilst people who don't know or care about, like footballers or RnB singers, can f*ck off because they're now defined to you by their crime. Everything anyone can say about Chris Brown and Chris Brown's fan base can be just as easily said about anyone who has ever cheered or appreciated to looked forward to one of Stone Cold's returns, or been to a Fozzy show, you're another fan cheering on a woman beater, but it feels different to you, because you're on the inside.

 

I had no idea about any of them. I think regardless of whether you liked them or not before their crime became public, it shouldn't affect your judgement of their crime. Like, I won't be able to view any of them the same way now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The details of the incident make me think he was very unlucky to be sent to prison in the first place. This isn't a case of him grabbing a woman in a park at midnight, dragging her into some bushes and raping her, there are question marks over the victim and how much she actually remembers about the 'assault'. The decision to send him to prison was a strange one, I think, and given that there was a strong element of doubt, I think it was wrong. The official verdict has to be respected but I'd be less forgiving if this was a clear cut case of rape rather than there being so much ambiguity.

 

Given he's now served his time, I see no reason why a club shouldn't employ him again though. Morally, it's questionable, and if I was a manager I wouldn't want my club to be tarnished by signing him but saying that, he has a right to work and a right to get on with his life, like every other former criminal has. I don't agree with politicians coming out to say he shouldn't be hired again because it's not respecting the judges verdict. He's served his time and deserves to get on with his life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no debate on whether he should be allowed to return to Football. Whether any club is willing to take a punt on him is a completely different thing.

 

The same applies to any convicted criminal and potential employers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Footballers demonstrably aren't overpaid by the fact that the people paying them are still making enormous amounts of money. Saying footballer's are overpaid is like saying aeroplanes are too heavy.
300k a week for playing football is overpaid it's not like an important job like a doctor or leader.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not strictly true, hence it being from the Daily Mail.

 

Under F.A. rules, if a player is released from their contract, evan if it's for criminal reasons, unless the player retires, the old club have to keep paying his contract until a new club sign him. Considering that he was in prison at the time, it was impossible for him to sign for a new club and so Sheffield had to keep paying the rest of his contract. This is also why Sheffield never bothered firing him, because then they'd have had to buy his contract out and keep paying him his salary anyway, so they just kept him on the books because it's the cheapest option and let his contract expire. They didn't really have a choice, and they didn't pay him the entire time, just until his contract ran out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

People did kick up a bit of stink when Lee Hughes was coming back into the game but not as much because the original offense wasn't covered as much on the news to begin with.

 

But seen as Evans is a 'former Manchester City player' and a full Welsh International in the eyes of the media in a time were that club is doing well then it was given more coverage then the Lee Hughes case during the investigation and of course afterwards.

 

My main question is, if she had sex the same night with both Evans and the Port Vale defender, most likely around the same time then why did Evans get sent down and the other lad didn't?

Edited by Evil Gringo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a really tough one. CAN he play again? Well of course he can, he's done his time and this is his profession, of which his skills are in demand. SHOULD he play again, as a convicted rapist, and not only a convicted rapist but an unrepentant convicted rapist? I wouldn't sign him, and as a Welshman I hope he doesn't get picked again for the national side. Saying that, will my tone change should Evans become the next Radomel Falcao and signs for Barcelona? I don't know, I'd like to think not but I couldn't promise that.

 

Couple of people have mentioned the somewhat odd details surrounding his conviction, regarding the girl's admitted drunkenness and the Port Vale fellow also having sex with her but avoiding a prison sentence. Why? It's a nagging feeling which, as a bloke who sometimes has sex with girls, you wonder if meeting a drunk bird at a nightclub and having sex with her would result in my prison sentence too. Are the details and evidence from his trial in the public sphere? For one to go to jail and the other not, you've got to think there's some incriminating evidence somewhere which proves one had sex and the other raped.

 

For me at least, given the choice, I'd consign Ched Evans to the scrapheap. I just wouldn't feel right morally with that on my conscience.

 

Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are quite a few footballers over the years who have committed assault, actual bodily harm and hell even killed people.

 

Patrick Kluivert killed someone whilst at Ajax via dangerous driving and did 240 hours of community service before going on to have a stellar career. No one batted a bloody eyelid.

 

Craig Thomson showed his manly bits to a 12 and a 14 year old girl, offered to have sex with the 14 years old and sex chatted with them. He was given a £4,000 fine and put on the sex offenders register for 5 years. Hearts loaned him out to Lithuania and since then he has played for another club over there before coming back to Scotland to play lower league football.

 

Vinnie Jones whilst at QPR committed an act of assault, got a minor sentence, was allowed to play for the club again as well once released. Joey Barton, at City and Newcastle, committed acts of assault and was allowed to return to both teams.

 

Graham Rix, then 42 and assistant manager of Chelsea back in 1999 was convicted for 12 months for sleeping with a 15 year old - he was released in 6 months and allowed to return to Chelsea in his previous role.

 

Luke McCormick whilst at Plymouth caused a crash that killed two kids whilst driving around drunk as hell. He did his time, came back for Truro and then Oxford and is now back at Plymouth where he is, get this, the club captain.

 

Go look at Marlon King's rap sheet - the worst of which was Sexual Assault and Actual Bodily Harm whilst a Wigan player back in 2008-09. He was convicted, served time, released and found work at both Coventry and Birmingham City after that.

 

The of course we have Lee Hughes, killed someone by dangerous driving back in 2003, did 3 years, signed by Oldham once he leaves the club, then in 2011 beats a women up, originally charged with sexual assault and battery it was dropped down to common assault but Notts County still employed him.

 

There are no morals in football - he will find a club in League One or Two and maybe one day end up back in the Championship. I don't think Wales will pick him again but aside from that, no matter what peoples moral objections are, he will find work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...