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R.I.P George Best


Hoffmeister
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I am listening to talksport radio and understand George Best will die in the next few hours.

 

It is a real shame and I would like to offer my condolences in advance. I wish there would be a miracle and he would be ok but the doctors have said the damage is irrepairable.

 

He was a stupid man, throwing away all of his fantastic talent for booze. However he always came accross as a good man and not a troublemaker like Craig Bellamy or Joey Barton.

 

R.I.P George

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"I spent 90% of my money on women and drink, the rest I wasted " -George Best

 

Great article from the Guardian on him:

 

"In 1976, Northern Ireland were drawn against Holland in Rotterdam as one of their group qualifying matches for the World Cup. Back then the reporters stayed at the same hotel as the team and travelled with them on the coach to the game. As it happened I sat beside George on the way to the stadium that evening.

 

Holland - midway between successive World Cup final appearances - and Johan Cruyff were at their peak at the time. George wasn't. I asked him what he thought of the acknowledged world number one and he said he thought the Dutchman was outstanding. 'Better than you?' I asked. George looked at me and laughed. 'You're kidding aren't you? I tell you what I'll do tonight... I'll nutmeg Cruyff first chance I get.' And we both laughed at the thought.

 

A couple of hours later the Irish players were announced one by one on to the pitch. Pat Jennings, as goalkeeper, was first out of the tunnel to appreciative applause. Best, as No 11, was last. 'And now,' revved up the PA guy, 'Number 11, Georgie [long pause] Best.' And out trotted George. Above him, a beautiful blonde reached over with a single, long-stemmed red rose.

 

Given his nature, his training and his peripheral vision there was no way he was going to miss her or the rose, so he stopped, trotted back, reached up to take the flower, kissed her hand and ran out on to the pitch waving his rose at the punters as the applause grew even louder.

 

Five minutes into the game he received the ball wide on the left. Instead of heading towards goal he turned directly infield, weaved his way past at least three Dutchmen and found his way to Cruyff who was wide right. He took the ball to his opponent, dipped a shoulder twice and slipped it between Cruyff's feet. As he ran round to collect it and run on he raised his right fist into the air.

 

Only a few of us in the press box knew what this bravado act really meant. Johan Cruyff the best in the world? Are you kidding? Only an idiot would have thought that on this evening.

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Whilst it's hard to have a great sympathy for him, I'd never wish someone to go through what he's going through now. He might have brought it on himself but it's still sad. Alcoholism is an illness and it's a bit concerning I guess how lots of people are so cold about the whole thing.

 

The greatest footballer Britain has ever produced.

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Meh.

 

Bought it on himself. No sympathy after he resumed his drinking following the transplant.

As others have said, Inno hit the nail right on the head with that statement. The guy spunked away his new liver and had no regards for his own health. I have no sympathy at all.

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As a United fan and a football fan I love what he did for my club and what he gave the game of football on the pitch...

 

Off the pitch however he caused himself all sorts of problems that were well documented over the years. These ulitmately lead to his down fall...

 

And whilst many say good things about Eddie even in the wake of his some what self induced death, I feel I can't do the same thing for George at all.

 

At least Eddie stopped, realised what he was doing and tried to help himself to have a second chance.... George was given one and pissed it away just as quick as he got it....

 

So R.I.P. the Best of 1963-1969, the greatest footballer player to live...

 

And good riddance to George Best 1970-2005, a man who wasted his talent, his liver and the rest of his life.

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Whilst it's hard to have a great sympathy for him, I'd never wish someone to go through what he's going through now. He might have brought it on himself but it's still sad. Alcoholism is an illness and it's a bit concerning I guess how lots of people are so cold about the whole thing.

 

The greatest footballer Britain has ever produced.

 

 

I agree with you here Crippler anyone who can dismiss his death like its nothing should be ashamed of themselves true he brang it upon himself but the guy was an alcholic and he couldn't beat the addiction.

 

My cousin is an alcoholic and it wouldn't make me any less upset if he passed away

 

We all know he brang this upon himself so theres no need to act like its a big unexpected tragedy he may have wated his gifts and life but he bring alot of joy to alot of people as well

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Seen as he was drunken, womenising and women beating kinda guy off the pitch after his career ended?

 

I can judge as my gran went through that with my grandad before she died early of cancer and suffering a nervous breakdown....

 

I see George Best and then I see my grandad....

 

I have a mum on the transplant list and needing a kidney desperatley and he gets a organ remarkably quicky and squanders it...

 

And I still see my mum tied to a dialysis machine and dying slowly in front of me...

 

So when it comes to George Best I can judge plenty.

 

I feel sorry for his family of course, to not do would be inhuman, but for him? No.

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Best will be classed as a legend in football. However he will be remembered by other people for the bad stuff. Best had the chance to start over again and get something which alot of people dont have and thats a second chance in life, however he couldnt control himself and he threw it away.

 

It's a tragic waste of a life however it could have been advoided if he could have just stayed off the booze

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On the contary I will always remember the George Best that scored THAT goal against Benfica in Portugal in 1965, the Best that took it round the keeper against Benfica im the '68 European Cup final, the Best that scored that blinder against Chelsea when he should have crossed...

 

I will remember the genius of George Best.... but I can't sympathise with how he died because of why he did die.

 

But like I said special circumstances dictate that mindset for me...

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I'm just shocked that you all can't show a tiny bit of compassion' date=' due to the pain that the man is in. Theres no need to be harsh about human suffering.[/quote']

 

If a man is foolish enough to walk the coals and then feel his feet burn then he has no right asking his fellow men for compassion as it was he who made the choice.

 

Life is all about choice and accepting them and the consequences and learning to accept that people will most of the time not give a damn for your pain is part of life for soooo many people.

 

Just becase he is George Best doesn't mean I should care for his self-inflicted pain. Would you do the same for a person who took drugs and contracted HIV or OD'd?

 

No, because they choose that path and it caused them pain just as they where warned.

 

He was warned till people where sick and tired of doing so. His ex-wife, his son, his family, his friends....

 

And he didn't listen. He was stupid and now he pays the price. Thats the true circle of life.

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Hell I do, I did them and I OD'd....

 

Not hard drugs like Coke and Herion etc but the sort of stuff Eddie was on, painkillers, sleepers etc....

 

So you know what I did? I realised what I was doing, realised my mistake and the pain I was causing others LET ALONE myself and I cleaned up and I am now over two years sober.

 

I hardly drink anymore as well....

 

Now if a kid of 17 (at the time) can do that why couldn't a man with so much already to live for do the same?

 

Like I'm saying Nic, going off my own experiances with addication, the previlage of getting a transplant and drunken relatives... Well with that I can't feel sorry for him.

 

I only hope his pain ends soon at least and his family can cope and they have my thoughts.

 

He on the other hand has no true sympathy coming from me.

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Its an illness, you beat it Gringo...he didnt. Its crap but its life.

 

I just hope his family are OK.

 

But the fact that irks me is that he never seemed to want to try and beat it even when given a second chance in a time when organs available for transplant are at an all time low....

 

But hey, I think I've said my piece already.

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One of the final products of booze football, George Best became one of the people you wanted to be and the person you least wanted to be.

 

As a professional footballer, his case is a teestament to the pressure of the game.

 

His life is a testament to anti drinking laws and prohibition as smoking is in the current light.

 

George, we think was an asshole for getting a new liver and still dying, hate to put this to you all but a new liver is not the recipe to a comfortable life, despite what the papers say a new liver isn't the lease of life they say it is and it is probably rejection that is getting him rather than a real return to the booze.

 

You say he deserves to die for drinking, yet the same defilers are binge drinkers clubbing as a fag or a fag hag, or a wannabe or whatever.

 

None of us can talk about drinking from an ethical point of view, we are all hypocrites.

 

George you were a god, but Gods fall and may God have mercy upon you.

 

Saz

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My father was an alcoholic, and a violent one at that. But he knew he would never be able to beat it, so when he had waited 9 years for a heart transplant, when a donor was found, he rejected it, because he was scared he would waste it. The person who got the heart made it through the surgery, and my dad died five months later.

 

I don't have many fond memories of my father, but I can find some glimmer of them due to the fact he sacrificed himself for someone else who would have lived a better life. George Best didn't do that.

 

P.S.

 

None of us can talk about drinking from an ethical point of view' date=' we are all hypocrites.[/quote']

 

Not all of us. I can identify with the alcoholism in relation to the others I've experienced, but the way he's treated his family and his life defies all reasonable levels of sympathy.

Edited by Chris2K
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