Jump to content

The (late) News, by Darkie


Paul

Recommended Posts

Sorry about the lateness of this weeks news, but Im becoming homeless soon so have been a touch preocupied! ;)

 

Anyhow:

 

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Obese Americans are overwhelming medical imaging machines that now have a hard time peering inside their bodies, doctors have reported.

"Hospital radiology departments are increasingly unable to adequately image and assess obese patients because of the limitations in current radiology equipment," said Raul Uppot, a physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

 

Equipment makers "need to think about design changes and technological advancements to obtain quality imaging in larger patients," he added.

 

"In the meantime, radiologists need to be aware of the limitations of their current imaging equipment and optimise current protocols and equipment settings to accommodate America's fattening population," Uppot said.

 

He and colleagues released their report at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. It was based on a review of 15 years of radiologic exams at the Boston hospital that had been labelled as being of limited use because of body size.

 

The percentage of such reports nearly doubled over the period, the researchers said, and corresponded to increases in obesity in the United States. Over the 15 years, obesity increased in Massachusetts from 9 percent of the population to 16 percent.

 

The biggest problems were with abdominal ultrasound followed by chest X-ray and abdominal computed tomography, the report said.

 

More than 60 percent of Americans are overweight or obese, with a much higher risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some cancers than people of healthy weight.

 

The American Obesity Association estimates that 127 million people in the United States are overweight, 60 million are obese, and 9 million are severely obese.

 

 

God bless America!

 

------------------------------------------------------------------

 

SEOUL (Reuters) - Forget desktop photographs of your children.

Doting South Korean parents can preserve their child's umbilical cord in acrylic resin to make a personal seal or even have it gold plated.

 

In this Confucian society where family values are highly prized, suppliers also offer services for parents to have traditional Korean calligraphy brushes made from their child's hair.

 

Shim Jae-cheol of U&I Impression said the firm had gold-plated about 80 to 100 umbilical cords a month since starting business in August, with prices ranging from 80,000 won to 100,000 won (40-50 pounds). It also offers mail order.

 

South Korean law allows parents to keep the umbilical cord of their children, although sales to a third party would be illegal.

 

Another supplier, Agamo, which makes calligraphy brushes made from human hair and preserves umbilical cords in personal seals, hopes to branch out to Japan.

 

"The company got the idea from mothers just storing umbilical cords and navels in an album or what-not," said Suk Tae-jin of Agamo.

 

Keeping children's umbilical cords and making calligraphy brushes from their hair have long been a long tradition in Korea.

 

 

 

Ummm, interesting! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Not taking away from Darkstar, I found this interesting article and this is the most appropriate thread to share.

 

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - The discovery of a tomb filled with decapitated bodies suggests Mexico's 2,000 year-old "Pyramid of the Moon" may have been the site of horrifically gory sacrifices, archaeologists say.

 

The tomb at Teotihuacan, the first major city built in the Americas, whose origins are one of history's great mysteries, also held the bound carcasses of eagles, dogs and other animals.

 

"It is hard to believe that the ritual consisted of clean, symbolic performances -- it is most likely that the ceremony created a horrible scene of bloodshed with sacrificed people and animals," Saburo Sugiyama, one of the scientists leading the ongoing dig, said on Thursday.

 

"Whether the victims and animals were killed at the site or a nearby place, this foundation ritual must have been one of the most terrifying acts recorded archeologically in Mesoamerica."

 

Of the 12 human bodies found, 10 were decapitated and then tossed, rather than arranged, on one side of the burial site. The two other bodies were richly ornamented with beads and a necklace made of imitation human jaws.

 

The Aztecs came across Teotihuacan's towering stone pyramids in about 1500 A.D., centuries after the city was torched and abandoned. It is not known what language its inhabitants spoke, but the Aztecs named it "The Place Where Men Become Gods," believing it was a divine site.

 

A major tourist site, it lies about 35 miles (56 km) northeast of Mexico City.

 

After 200 years of excavations, archaeologists are still largely in the dark about the origins of the city, which is believed to have housed 200,000 people at its peak in 500 A.D. -- rivalling Shakespeare's London, but a millennium earlier.

 

Sugiyama said the nearly complete excavation indicates the Pyramid of the Moon was significant to its builders as a site for celebrating state power through ceremony and sacrifice.

 

The sacrifices were carried out during the expansion of one of the city's major monuments, suggesting the government wanted to symbolize growing sacred political power.

 

"Contrary to some past interpretation, militarism was apparently central to the city's culture," the excavation team said in a statement.

 

The master-planned city-state collapsed around 700 A.D., an event as mysterious as its formation.

 

It was the site of a modern-day controversy earlier this year when protesters fought and lost a battle to keep the Mexican unit of retail giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc. from building a new store a half-mile (800 metres) away.

 

Kinda makes you wonder what we would be doing without cable telivision. :devil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.



×
×
  • Create New...