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Calling All Motorists!


Cactus Jack
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Chancellor Gordon Brown has left open the option of postponing the rises in fuel duty due in September.

Mr Brown said the focus should be on persuading oil exporters cartel Opec to get world prices under control, but he would review progress in August.

 

Opec has agreed to raise production by two million barrels a day. Mr Brown called that a welcome first step but argued more could be done.

 

Opposition parties want the 1.9p-a-litre planned duty rise to be scrapped.

 

Mr Blair said on Thursday the government had to see how the situation settled down after Opec's announcement on increasing oil production.

 

 

Talks pressure

 

Asked on Thursday evening whether he was ready to respond to pressure to abandon the duty rises, Mr Brown told BBC News he had already postponed increases until September.

 

 

Source: Esso

"Once I see the progress that is being made by Opec in raising production and getting the oil price under control I'll review the situation in August," he said.

"I want the focus of the next few weeks to be on where the source really lies, and the source of the problem is inadequate production and the instability in the Middle East."

 

The chancellor argued it would be "opportunistic" to move the focus away from the hikes in world oil problems.

 

He promised to continue to put the case for high production to oil ministers.

 

 

Haulage firms are warning the government to prepare for a series of protests if the cost of petrol and diesel does not come down.

 

Protest plans

 

Police say they expect about 300 lorries to converge on Cardiff for a demonstration over high petrol prices on Saturday.

 

Earlier Transport Secretary Alistair Darling said governments prepared for "all sorts of eventualities", but the UK had not reached a crisis point yet.

 

He was speaking after the Daily Express said leaked Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) documents showed secret government plans to deal with a potential crisis.

 

 

HAVE YOUR SAY

In the Isle of Man, you can't get petrol for under about 92p per litre now!

Evan, UK

 

The paper says Britain could be put on a three-day week, drivers could face bans or face petrol rationing and sporting events like Wimbledon could be cancelled.

 

Mr Darling told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "Some people - like [Tory leader] Michael Howard - wish to almost provoke these difficulties."

 

Mr Howard told BBC's Five Live: "I don't think there should be the kind of protest which would disrupt people's lives and stop people going about their law-abiding activities."

 

 

His message to Mr Brown was simple: "Do not put fuel duty up in September."

'Worst case plans'

 

For the Lib Dems, Mr Kennedy accused Michael Howard of "reprehensible gesture politics" for saying he might back protests.

 

A DTI spokesman said it would not comment on the leaked document.

 

But he said there were "contingency plans in place in case of worst-case scenarios to make sure there is no disruption of supply".

 

The average cost of a litre of unleaded petrol on Wednesday was 82.82p - up nearly 2p on the previous day - and some petrol stations were charging more than 90p a litre.

 

If prices continue to rise, the average UK price of petrol could approach the 85.32p recorded in June 2000, which sparked widespread fuel protests.

 

So, a couple of questions!

 

Do you see a national petrol strike a la 2000, and would you agree with such a move?

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Well Britain being an oil producing country thank god we don't have to worry about oil supply, oh wait I forgot its a big secret that their's oil in the North Sea!

 

I will support a national petrol strike, the amount of tax the government put on motorists is rediculous, and something needs to be done. I'll also support it because hopefully it will get Labour kicked out come the elections!

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I would fully support a national petrol strike, it is an absolute disgrace that this country pays the most money for petrol in the whole of Europe! The current government taxes us motorists way too much and something needs to be done.
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Let's face it, they've got us motorists by the short and curlies really. People who have cars will want to use their cars, and will pay stupid amounts of money to use them, especially if it's for work purposes. At the moment it's 82.9p per litre round by me, and I filled up this morning.
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Although I think petrol prices are way too expensive, I'm self employed and therefore will not earn a penny if I have to take time off due to a petrol strike. You could say the government have the likes of me and Verb by the b******s.

 

A petrol strike hits the wrong people in the pocket.

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you think a petrol strike is a good idea, but theres no way it can carry on for more than a week or so, because it basically cripples the entire nation, and people have to go about their daily business whichis impossible without a functioning transport network. And theres no way the government will cave in, because then if any other group have a grievence with them, they think "ahh, the government caved in at the fuel protests, lets hold one of our own" and the whole thing starts up again
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I hardly think a strike is childish, especially when you consider that the main antagonists of the strike itself are the long distance haulage workers, who will suffer more than any of us day to day workers.

 

This whole situation has been going on for far too long. Although people seem to miss the issue. The oil compaines are just as much to blame as the Government. True 80% of the cost may go in tax but the oil companies still make huge profits and i can 100% guarentee that when the price of oil goes back down, the price of petorl will not go back down to proportionately. Sure it will go down, but not back to the previous levels.

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I hardly think a strike is childish, especially when you consider that the main antagonists of the strike itself are the long distance haulage workers, who will suffer more than any of us day to day workers.

 

This whole situation has been going on for far too long. Although people seem to miss the issue. The oil compaines are just as much to blame as the Government. True 80% of the cost may go in tax but the oil companies still make huge profits and i can 100% guarentee that when the price of oil goes back down, the price of petorl will not go back down to proportionately. Sure it will go down, but not back to the previous levels.

 

:thumbsup

 

Just like when the prices that went up for meat "temporarily due to the foot and mouth crisis". They obviously have a different defination for temporarily than I do!

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Fuel protesters head for Cardiff

About 300 lorries and coaches are expected to take part in a protest in Cardiff demanding lower fuel prices.

Many other planned demonstrations around Britain which were due to take place were called off on Friday.

 

The decision was made when the government said it would review its plans to impose an additional tax on fuel in the autumn.

 

But the Road Haulage Association said that the peaceful protest in Wales would go ahead as planned.

 

 

Prime Minister Tony Blair said no decision would be taken yet about extra fuel taxes but ministers had to be sensitive to the needs of motorists.

 

He echoed the chancellor's promise to keep the planned fuel duty increase of 1.9p-a-litre in September "under review".

 

Mr Brown said the focus should be on persuading Opec to get world prices under control.

 

Opec has agreed to raise production by two million barrels a day.

 

Mr Brown called that a welcome first step but argued more could be done.

 

Opposition parties want the planned duty rise to be scrapped.

 

'Positive sign'

 

Martin Palmer, spokesman for the Low Tax on Fuel group, which is organising a protest in Cardiff said comments by Mr Brown and Mr Blair were "a step in the right direction" but not enough.

 

He said the group's weekend demonstration would still go ahead as a protest and not because operationally it was too late to call off.

 

David Handley, chairman of Farmers for Action, said his group was postponing a protest.

 

"Gordon Brown has clearly indicated he is going to look and go back and reinvestigate the increase," he said.

 

"We feel we should give him two to three weeks - you can still protest in September."

 

The wheels could be in motion.....

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