Jump to content

Popsi

Deadicated Fans
  • Posts

    5,038
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

Popsi last won the day on February 27 2011

Popsi had the most liked content!

1 Follower

Converted

  • Occupation
    N/A

Popsi's Achievements

Grand Master

Grand Master (14/14)

  • First Post
  • Collaborator
  • Posting Machine Rare
  • Conversation Starter
  • Week One Done

Recent Badges

192

Reputation

  1. Haha, we've tried suggesting beatings with large sticks but so far it doesn't seem to be a goer ;) A 72 year old man with a 40 year old woman isn't a paedophile as shes not a child. It's just a bit weird and gross.
  2. Haha, we've tried suggesting beatings with large sticks but so far it doesn't seem to be a goer ;) A 72 year old man with a 40 year old woman isn't a paedophile as shes not a child. It's just a bit weird and gross.
  3. That's why I wrote that they feel like they can't control their urges. Of course they can, but for some of them it's incredibly difficult. That's not to say that we should feel sorry for them, or that it excuses their offending but what it does mean is that we have to figure out how to manage such an imminent risk so that no one is harmed by it. It's about being realistic, some of the men that describe their desire to offend as such don't want to offend, but they aren't convinced that they are strong enough not to do so. I will reiterate though that this is an incredibly small percentage of prisoners that may feel that way. And that's not mostly the problem, not by a long shot.
  4. That's why I wrote that they feel like they can't control their urges. Of course they can, but for some of them it's incredibly difficult. That's not to say that we should feel sorry for them, or that it excuses their offending but what it does mean is that we have to figure out how to manage such an imminent risk so that no one is harmed by it. It's about being realistic, some of the men that describe their desire to offend as such don't want to offend, but they aren't convinced that they are strong enough not to do so. I will reiterate though that this is an incredibly small percentage of prisoners that may feel that way. And that's not mostly the problem, not by a long shot.
  5. From my own experiences I don't think the majority feel like they have uncontrollable urges. Most of them experience high levels of shame (and eventually remorse) and acknowledge that it is exactly something they can control. I think that's the same for adult and child sex offenders. I haven't particulrly noticed a difference in acknowledgement of the problem of their offending. Of course there are some prisoners who do feel like they can't control their urges to offend - and those are the very high risk guys that we'll look at medication or sectioning for. We haven't got any longitudinal studies as far as I'm aware yet regarding long term (15 year plus) recidivism rates. That's just due to the relative new-ness of the intervention. But early signs are positive, and certainly in-prison behaviour is improving for the men that are in DSPDs. As far as I'm aware there is nothing to suggest they are making prisoners worse however. In fact hte MOJ sent round a paper to us last week outlining the increased funding for this type of prisoner - additional places for DSPDs in the Prison Estate as they believe in them so much. I can't provide a link for the paper I'm afraid as it's a consultation one and hasn't yet been published. I completely agree that those men who score highly on the PCL-R (we don't call men psychopaths in work) tend to have distorted cognitions, particularly regarding consequential awareness. But that does not mean that they are incapable of doing so, merely that they do not give the full weighting to the consequences, don't consider them fully, or only consider the ones that benefit them. The lack of empathy has a significant impact on their consequential awareness ability I find - they just don't care about any negative consequences for anyone else. Thanks Saz! I've been lurking for a while, and this discussion piqued my interest! I see you've been to Japan recently? I went in April last year to visit my sister, great place!
  6. From my own experiences I don't think the majority feel like they have uncontrollable urges. Most of them experience high levels of shame (and eventually remorse) and acknowledge that it is exactly something they can control. I think that's the same for adult and child sex offenders. I haven't particulrly noticed a difference in acknowledgement of the problem of their offending. Of course there are some prisoners who do feel like they can't control their urges to offend - and those are the very high risk guys that we'll look at medication or sectioning for. We haven't got any longitudinal studies as far as I'm aware yet regarding long term (15 year plus) recidivism rates. That's just due to the relative new-ness of the intervention. But early signs are positive, and certainly in-prison behaviour is improving for the men that are in DSPDs. As far as I'm aware there is nothing to suggest they are making prisoners worse however. In fact hte MOJ sent round a paper to us last week outlining the increased funding for this type of prisoner - additional places for DSPDs in the Prison Estate as they believe in them so much. I can't provide a link for the paper I'm afraid as it's a consultation one and hasn't yet been published. I completely agree that those men who score highly on the PCL-R (we don't call men psychopaths in work) tend to have distorted cognitions, particularly regarding consequential awareness. But that does not mean that they are incapable of doing so, merely that they do not give the full weighting to the consequences, don't consider them fully, or only consider the ones that benefit them. The lack of empathy has a significant impact on their consequential awareness ability I find - they just don't care about any negative consequences for anyone else. Thanks Saz! I've been lurking for a while, and this discussion piqued my interest! I see you've been to Japan recently? I went in April last year to visit my sister, great place!
  7. Like it or not offenders live lives like the rest of us, the majority of the time. They hold jobs, they socialise, and they have partners and children. They have the same goals as us - family, stability, happiness, security, love. But they also offend in ways we cant imagine doing. To help people not to reoffend we need to help them understand their risk, know how to manage it and build a life that is as normal as possible. For some sex offenders particularly, living isolated, nonmainstream lives is the exact situation that makes them more likely to offend. Actually there is treatment for psychopaths and sociopaths currently available in the uk. They're known as DSPD units for dangerous and severe personality disordered offenders. Initial outcomes are positive but were waiting for longer term outcome studies. And psychopaths most of the time are perfectly aware of the consequences of their behaviour, they just don't care about them.
  8. Like it or not offenders live lives like the rest of us, the majority of the time. They hold jobs, they socialise, and they have partners and children. They have the same goals as us - family, stability, happiness, security, love. But they also offend in ways we cant imagine doing. To help people not to reoffend we need to help them understand their risk, know how to manage it and build a life that is as normal as possible. For some sex offenders particularly, living isolated, nonmainstream lives is the exact situation that makes them more likely to offend. Actually there is treatment for psychopaths and sociopaths currently available in the uk. They're known as DSPD units for dangerous and severe personality disordered offenders. Initial outcomes are positive but were waiting for longer term outcome studies. And psychopaths most of the time are perfectly aware of the consequences of their behaviour, they just don't care about them.
  9. I've been reading this thread with interest, and it's good to see a largely unemotional discussion about a topic that pretty much every else becomes a nasty flamewar. In answer to the question recently posed, a true sexual preference for children is very rare. Generally for child sex offenders, it's an ability to be aroused to children, or that a child is there in the absence of an adult that will mean they offend. And regarding rapists, research has shown that there are very very few men with a sexual preference for rape, and in fact that as a risk factor has been removed from the risk assessment tool in general use for sex offenders. Preferring sex to involve violence or humiliation is in there, but only being able to have sex if it is rape is incredibly rare. I do have to pick up something in the above post though. All offenders (sexual or violent) are normal human beings, and most of the time exhibit normal human behaviour. Yes, they commit acts of terrible horror, but they are people just like you and I. We have to apply human norms to them, because that is what we should expect of them. Rehabilitation involves trying to help reduce their risk to an extent that they can live normal, offence free lives. Assuming they're somehow 'not human' doesn't help anyone. Yes, as everyone has correctly said, you cannot change the sexual preference of someone, and therefore you work on developing their awareness of their risk, situations that are high risk for him, and strategies to manage such situations. You teach them empathy, and consequential awareness, and how to solve their problems more effectively. You teach them how to have a normal initmate relationship, and how to talk to people if they are struggling with something. For some, yes they are prescribed anti-libidinol drugs, and for other cases it's chemical castration (ignore the human rights stuff, it does happen.) In extreme cases (recently it happened to one of the men I work with) they are sectioned under the DSM criteria of paedophilia (that is they pose a current, significant risk of harm due to their sexual preference.) But what you don't do, is give up and say they'll never change. All people are capeable of change, if they want to. Not all sexual and violent offenders want to change, and some of them say they want to change but don't really. But I see enough, every day, to convince me that we can't just not bother trying.
  10. I've been reading this thread with interest, and it's good to see a largely unemotional discussion about a topic that pretty much every else becomes a nasty flamewar. In answer to the question recently posed, a true sexual preference for children is very rare. Generally for child sex offenders, it's an ability to be aroused to children, or that a child is there in the absence of an adult that will mean they offend. And regarding rapists, research has shown that there are very very few men with a sexual preference for rape, and in fact that as a risk factor has been removed from the risk assessment tool in general use for sex offenders. Preferring sex to involve violence or humiliation is in there, but only being able to have sex if it is rape is incredibly rare. I do have to pick up something in the above post though. All offenders (sexual or violent) are normal human beings, and most of the time exhibit normal human behaviour. Yes, they commit acts of terrible horror, but they are people just like you and I. We have to apply human norms to them, because that is what we should expect of them. Rehabilitation involves trying to help reduce their risk to an extent that they can live normal, offence free lives. Assuming they're somehow 'not human' doesn't help anyone. Yes, as everyone has correctly said, you cannot change the sexual preference of someone, and therefore you work on developing their awareness of their risk, situations that are high risk for him, and strategies to manage such situations. You teach them empathy, and consequential awareness, and how to solve their problems more effectively. You teach them how to have a normal initmate relationship, and how to talk to people if they are struggling with something. For some, yes they are prescribed anti-libidinol drugs, and for other cases it's chemical castration (ignore the human rights stuff, it does happen.) In extreme cases (recently it happened to one of the men I work with) they are sectioned under the DSM criteria of paedophilia (that is they pose a current, significant risk of harm due to their sexual preference.) But what you don't do, is give up and say they'll never change. All people are capeable of change, if they want to. Not all sexual and violent offenders want to change, and some of them say they want to change but don't really. But I see enough, every day, to convince me that we can't just not bother trying.
  11. We tend to call them prisoners but I don't think that's due to anything PC, but more because they're in prison! Officers tend to call then Con's but they have a differet relationship to prisoners than we have. We do have sentences that are that very definition - Indeterminant Sentences for Public Protection. Those are for sentences that were likely to be over 4 years, but aren't eligible to be lifers due to the nature of their crime. They're given a tariff, but they won't be released on licence until their risk is reduced to a sufficient level. We're getting more and more sex offenders and violent offenders on ISPPs now.
  12. Tis the system, can't remember why they've changed it to that, though probably due in part to more people being sentenced. It's also because it makes more sense to at least have them supervised on release, rather than just be released at the end of their sentence with no supervisio at all. Most obviously violent people get longer sentences anyway, which hopefully gives them time to address their behaviour, reduce their risk and put plans in place on release.
  13. There's no such thing as 'time off for good behaviour' unless you're talking about someone getting Parole, but that's a whole new ball game. That's about someone having reduced their risk to such a level that it's felt they can be managed in the community. Good prison behaviour isn't the be all and end all of it. The Criminal Justice Act of 2003 changed sentencing laws, and now prisoners serving a certain amount of time spend half of that in prison and the rest on licence. Can't remember if he comes under that due to only having a 4 month sentence. Everyone will complete their full sentence, just not all of it in prison. We've got lifers where I work who've been in since before I was born 26 years ago, so I wouldn't take as read that lifers will only serve around 14 years and it's likely that most IPPs will serve at least half that, let alone lifers.
  14. He'd reached the end of his prison sentence, so by law he had to be released. All the Prison can do is highlight the risk he poses and pass on any information to the Police Liaison Officer and Probation that they have. It's up to those on the outside then to decide how he's going to be monitored. Obviously in this case the information unfortunately wasn't acted on quickly enough, but in terms of releasing him it seems all was done as by law it should have been.
  15. I was born in Cambridge, England and lived there for about 2 years. I then spent the next 7 years bouncing between England and Germany living in various different army camps. The list included: Tidworth, Wolfenbuttel, Hamm, Sennelager and Braunsweig. Stints ranged between 6 months and 18 months at a time. Then when I was 9 my dad left the Army and we moved to Chepstow, South Wales which is about half an hour away from where my parents are from (Pontypool.) I went to uni at 18 in Swansea and then lived in a couple of different places around South East Wales. Now I'm back home in Chepstow living with my parents and paying off my debt! Am currently job hunting so could end up anywhere but Weston Supermare is a contender. Would love to live abroad, Canada or the US but that's just a pipe dream!
×
×
  • Create New...